Connewarre names

Anzac hatEdward Henry ASHMORE

Service No:   69462
Rank:            Private
Unit:             depot – 8TH refts GSG

Born 27/1/1899, Sale
Son of William and Elisa Ashmore from Sale
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a farmer

Edward enlisted 17/09/1918 at Melbourne as a single man
He didn’t embark for overseas
Served at the Training Depot
Discharged as consequence of AIF demobilization
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads

Ted was raised by his grandmother after his parents died in 1909/10. He moved from Sale to Connewarre where he was working when he enlisted in 1918 at the age of 19. After serving 99 days at the Broadmeadows Depot, Edward (Ted) was discharged because of the demobilization of the AIF. He later married Alice Barnett, lived in Geelong and worked as a storeman until his death in 1972.

 

Anzac hatHerbert Kitchener BARNETT

Service No:   80180
Rank:            Private
Unit:             Recruit Depot Battalion

Born 17/6/1900, Barwon Heads
Son of Henry and Ann Barnett from Barwon Heads
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a driver

Herbert enlisted 17/09/1918 at Melbourne as a single man
He didn’t embark for overseas
Served at the Training Depot
Discharged as consequence of AIF demobilization
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads

Herbert enlisted just a couple of weeks after his 18th birthday in 1918 and ten weeks after his eldest brother Robert was killed in France. He served for 99 days at the Broadmeadows Recruitment Depot before being discharged because of the demobilization of the AIF. After his discharge, Herbert worked as a labourer. He lived in Barwon Heads until his marriage in 1933 to Hannah Cooper. They lived in Lower Plenty until the late 1940’s when they moved back to Barwon Heads after a short time in Ballarat. He was working as a greenkeeper at the time of his death in 1977.

 

Anzac hat KIARobert Mosman BARNETT

Service No:   3464
Rank:            Private
Unit:             22nd Battalion, 8th Reinforcement

Born 1896, Mt Duneed
Son of Henry and Ann Barnett from Barwon Heads
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a farm Labourer

Robert enlisted 16/08/1915 at Geelong as a single man
He embarked for overseas 5/01/1916 from Melbourne on HMAT A19 Afric
Served in France
Killed in Action 1/7/1918
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads
– Barrabool & Sth Barwon Shire
– Sth Barwon

After graduating from Connewarre Primary School, Robert worked as a baker. Not long after his eighteenth birthday in 1914, and two weeks after voluntary recruitment began in Australia he applied for active service. After 26 days of service Robert was discharged as ‘medically unfit’. From a letter Robert wrote to Base Records he recalls the discharge was ‘for not paying attention to the Sergeant’. A year later Robert enlisted in the AIF for the second time and was initially appointed to the ‘G’ Coy Geelong before being transferred to 8th Reinforcements, 22nd Battalion while in training at Broadmeadows.

After embarking at Melbourne, per HMAT “Afric” on 5th January 1916 and arriving in Egypt on 24th February1916 Robert was transferred to the 57th Battalion and then into the newly formed 58th Battalion composed predominantly of men from Victoria. The battalion was part of the 15th Brigade of the 5th Australian Division. Like many Australian soldiers, he began to present with repeated bouts of dysentery that revisited during the war. Also an episode of mumps kept him from re-joining his unit until 17th June 1916 when they left Alexandria for Marseilles arriving a week later. The 58th became embroiled in its first major battle on the Western Front at Fromelles on 19th July. The battle was a disaster. The 58th had the dual role of providing carrying parties and a reserve force. The reserve force (approximately half of the battalion) was ordered to attack late in the battle and was virtually annihilated by machine-gun fire; as a whole, the 58th suffered casualties equal to almost a third of its strength. Robert was one of those casualties with a gunshot wound to his scalp and chest.

He was discharged from hospital ten days later to re-join the unit which had continued to man the front in the Fromelles sector. Shortly after returning to the unit his mumps returned causing him to be in and out of hospital for the next 3 months. On New Year’s Eve (1916) Robert was charged, the crime was that “during active service, the conduct was to the prejudice of the good order and military discipline by appearing on parade at 1400, unshaven.” He was awarded 3 days forfeiture of pay.

Early in 1917 the 58th battalion participated in the advance that followed the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line. On 17th March 1917 Robert was wounded for the second time – a gunshot wound to the right buttock. He was sent to London for treatment. While recovering he went on leave and didn’t return one night – another offence causing him to forfeit 2 days’ pay. Fully recovered by October Robert proceeded overseas back to France re-joining the 58th Battalion on 2nd November.

With the collapse of Russia in October 1917, a major German offensive on the Western Front was expected in early 1918. This came in late March and the 5th Division moved to defend the sector around Corbie; the 58th Battalion was the 15th Brigade’s reserve during its now legendary counter-attack at Villers-Bretonneux on 25 April.

On the morning of 1st July, 1918, in the vicinity of Buire, Robert was member of a party of 30 which raided the enemy trenches. A member of the party reported seeing him wounded during the raid but there was not time to carry him back to the Australian trenches. He was left there until the raid was over. He was the only man who didn’t return. A fighting patrol proceeded out afterwards and found he was gone. Pte. Gallagher reported seeing him laying in the enemy trenches. It was believed impossible for him to be taken prisoner. He didn’t appear on any POW or injured prisoner lists. Presiding over the “In the Field” Court of Enquiry was Lieut. RV Moon, VC 58th Battalion. The court declared that Robert was killed in action.

 

Anzac hatHenry Arthur BARNETT

Service No:   69242
Rank:            Private
Unit:             Recruit Depot Battalion

Born 24/7/1898, Barwon Heads
Son of Henry and Ann Barnett from Barwon Heads
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a motor driver

Henry enlisted 13/06/1918 at Geelong as a single man
He didn’t embark for overseas
Served at the Training Depot
Discharged as consequence of AIF demobilization
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads

Henry, at 19 years of age, a motor driver and the second son of Henry and May enlisted in the AIF just two weeks before  his elder brother was killed in action in France. He served 195 at the Broadmeadows training camp before being discharged because of the demobilization of the AIF. He moved to Geelong from Barwon Heads and worked as a driver. Henry married Madge Swayn in 1920, they lived in Barwon Heads with Henry working as a baker. In 1937 Madge and Henry had moved to Lorne, Henry continuing to work as a baker. By 1949 they had moved to Geelong and Henry worked as a painter. He died 9th June 1975 at Geelong.

 

Anzac hatRussell Palmer BLAKE

Service No:   24634
Rank:            Driver
Unit:             Divisional Ammunition Column 3, Section 3

Born 1897, Corio
Son of Arthur and Eva Blake from Barwon Heads
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a bank clerk

Russell enlisted 23/03/1916 at Maribrynong as a single man
He embarked for overseas 27/06/1916 from Melbourne on HMAT A37 Barambah
Served in Western Front
Returned to Australia 1/7/1919
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads

Just before his 19th birthday, Russell, a clerk with the Bank of NSW, enlisted in the AIF. He had experience as a Private in the Citizen Forces (Infantry). At enlistment Russell was initially appointed as a Private to the AIF Infantry. A month later his rank was Gunner with the 7th Reinforcements, appointed 2 months later as Driver with the 3rd Australian Divisional Ammunition Column (DAC). The unit embarked from Melbourne aboard the HMAT Barambah on 27 June, 1916 arriving in England on 25 August. After a further 3 months intensive training the unit proceeded overseas to France arriving on 24 November and thereafter fought in many of the major actions of the war. A bout of Scabies and a bout of P.U.O interrupted his active service for a short while. The 3rd DAC was involved in campaigns including Messines, Broodeseinde, Passchendaele, Hamel, Amiens, Mont St Quentin, Hindenburg Line. Russell returned to Melbourne on 17 August 1919 per “Karmala”. He married Doris Johnstone in 1924 and they had two children, Ian and Geoff. All his working life Russell worked for the Bank of NSW across Victoria – Ouyen, Gardiner, Lockington, Sale. He took a keen interest in all sporting activities and the Returned Soldiers’ League and at the time of his death on August 31 1957 he was secretary-treasurer of the Linton (Vic) football Club and bank manager.

 

Anzac hat KIAFrancis Henry CHALLIS

Service No:   2644
Rank:            Private
Unit:             60th Battalion, 6th Reinforcement

Born 1884, Barwon Heads
Son of Francis Challis; husband of Elsie Challis from Sandringham
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a railway employee

Francis enlisted 7/02/1916 at Melbourne as a married man
He embarked for overseas 2/10/1916 from Melbourne on HMAT A71 Nestor
Served in Western Front
Killed in Action 12/5/1917
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads

Francis, a railway employee from Sandringham enlisted in February 1916. Initially training with the 23rd Battalion at Royal Park, Francis was transferred a few weeks later to the Field Artillery Battalion located at Maribyrnong and appointed Gunner. A short time later another transfer, this time to the 3rd Australian Divisional Ammunition Column and further training at Royal Park and Bendigo. On 24 August Francis was appointed Lance Corporal to the 6th Reinforcements, 60th Battalion. The unit embarked for active service abroad on 2 October 1916 aboard the HMAT Nestor arriving in England on 16 November. They proceeded overseas to France on 30 December. During the very bad winter Francis was sent to hospital sick on three occasions with influenza. On 12 May at Bullecourt, Francis was in the front line and hit by a sniper falling to the ground. Before help could arrive a high explosive shell landed near where he was laying, a soldier recalled he was ‘blown to pieces and it was hard to recognise him’. He was killed in action.

 

Anzac hatCharles Henry CHALLIS

Service No:   na
Rank:            Private
Unit:             Expeditinary Force

Born 1878, Mt Duneed
Son of Harry and Sarah Challis from Connewarre
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a farmer

Charles enlisted 13/07/1915 at Geelong as a single man
He didn’t embark for overseas
Died as a result of disease 10/9/1915 while in training
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads
– Barrabool & Sth Barwon Shire
– Sth Barwon

Charles Henry CHALLIS (1878 – 1915) born at Connewarre, the first of eight children to Harry and Sarah (nee Porter) Challis. When war broke out Charles was the first of three brothers to enlist. A single, 36 year old farmer at Connewarre. He enlisted at Geelong the following year and was attached to C Coy training at Bendigo. Five weeks later he became ill and was admitted to Bendigo Hospital with meningitis, succumbing to the disease three weeks later. He died on 10 September 1915 and is buried at Mt. Duneed Cemetery.

 

Edwin  CHALLIS

Service No:   3040
Rank:            Private
Unit:             2nd Machine Gun Battalion

Born 1882, Connewarre
Son of Harry and Sarah Challis from Connewarrre
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a foreman

Edwin enlisted 22/12/1916 at Geelong as a single man
He embarked for overseas 19/02/1917 from Melbourne on HMAT A70 Ballarat
Served in France, Western Front
Died as a result of wounds 18/12/1918
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads

Edwin, the second son of Harry and Sarah was appointed to the 7th Reinforcements, 38th Battalion on enlistment (22.12.1916) and sent for training to the Royal Park Camp. He enlisted 12 months after his elder brother died in training at Bendigo. After 8 weeks training the unit embarked on 19 February 1917 from Melbourne aboard the HMAT Ballarat. Just before reaching England on 25 April the Ballarat was sunk, no lives were lost. After further training in England the unit proceeded overseas to France on 11 October 1917 proceeding to the battle of Passchendaele. Belgium remained the focus of the 37th Battalion’s activities for the next five months, until it was rushed south to France in late March 1918 to meet the German Army’s Spring Offensive.

On 14 June 1918 Edwin was wounded in action – a gunshot wound to right shoulder and invalided to England. He was transferred to the 2nd Machine Gun Battalion and proceeded back to France re-joining the unit on 6 October 1918. An accident at the 47th Casualty Clearing Station located on a farm shattered Edwin’s leg and foot, and fractured his arm. He died the next day on 18 December 1918.

 

Anzac hat KIASydney Gordon CHALLIS

Service No:   5996
Rank:            Private
Unit:             14th Battalion, 19th Reinforcement

Born 1896, Mt Duneed
Son of Harry and Sarah Challis from Connewarre
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a farmer

Sydney enlisted 17/04/1916 at Geelong as a single man
He embarked for overseas 1/08/1916 from Melbourne on HMAT A28 Miltiades
Served in France
Killed in Action 11/4/1917
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads
– Barrabool & Sth Barwon Shire
– Sth Barwon

Sydney, a Connewarre farmer enlisted on 17 April 1916 just before his 20th birthday. He was appointed to the 14th Battalion, 19th Reinforcements training initially in Geelong before being transferred to Broadmeadows. The unit embarked from Melbourne per HMAT ‘Miltiades’ on 1 August 1916 arriving in England on 25 September. They proceeded overseas to France on 13 December.

Along with most of the 4th Brigade, the battalion suffered heavy losses at Bullecourt in April 1917 when the brigade attacked strong German positions without the promised tank support. During this engagement Sydney was reported missing in action. A court of Enquiry held in November found that he was killed in action on 11 April 1917.

 

Anzac hat KIAAlbert  CLERY

Service No:   2600
Rank:            Private
Unit:             60th Battalion

Born 1894, Connewarre
Son of Arthur and Susan Clery from Connewarre
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a labourer

Albert enlisted 30/07/1915 at Melbourne as a single man
He embarked for overseas 27/10/1915 from Melbourne on HMAT A38 Ulysses
Served in France
Killed in Action 19/7/1916
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads

Albert, working as a labourer, lived with his Aunt at Connewarre when he enlisted twelve months after Australia became involved in the war. After 8 weeks training he was appointed to the 6th Reinforcements of the 24th Battalion. On 27 October 1915, Albert embarked from Melbourne on the HMAT Ulysses with the 60th Battalion which he had been transferred to the day before.

The 60th Battalion was raised in Egypt on 24 February 1916 as part of the “doubling” of the AIF. Half of its recruits were Gallipoli veterans from the 8th Battalion, and the other half, fresh reinforcements from Australia. The majority of both groups were Victorians. The new battalion formed part of the 15th Brigade of the 5th Australian Division. Having only arrived in France on 28 June, the 60th became embroiled in its first major battle on the Western Front on 19 July, without the benefit of an introduction to the trenches in a “quiet” sector. The battle of Fromelles was a disaster for the battalion. In a single day, it was virtually wiped out, suffering 757 casualties. Albert was initially reported missing during this battle, and with no evidence he became a POW he was reported as being killed in action on 19 July 1916.

 

Anzac hatGeorge Arnold CUMMINGS

Service No:   78338
Rank:            Private
Unit:             Recruit Depot Battalion

Born 13/11/1894, Geelong
Son of George and Mary Cummings from Barwon Heads
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a agent

George enlisted 27/06/1918 at Geelong as a single man

He didn’t embark for overseas
Served in the Training Depot
Discharged as consequence of AIF demobilization
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads

On enlistment George, an ‘Agent’, was appointed to the 38th Reinforcements, Recruit Depot Battalion while in training at the Broadmeadows Camp. He served 181 days in the AIF before being discharged because of the demobilization of the AIF.

He married Kathleen Rochford in 1922, they had one daughter. The family moved many times around the Geelong area and George tried his hand at many different occupations – groom, conductor, salesman, labourer, and painter. He died in 1973

 

Anzac hatJohn Leo CUMMINGS

Service No:   2595
Rank:            Gunner
Unit:             2nd Pioneer Battalion, Reinforcement 5

Born 10/10/1896, North Geelong
Son of George and Mary Cummings from Barwon Heads
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a boatman

John enlisted 12/05/1916 at Geelong as a single man
He embarked for overseas 18/09/1916 from Melbourne on HMAT A10 Karroo
Served in France
Returned to Australia 1/4/1919
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads

John, a boatsman, served 2 years in the Navy aboard the HAMAS Cerberus, Psyche and Penguin. He was discharged as medically unfit on 9 April, 1916. The following month he enlisted in the AIF and was appointed to the rank of Private with the 19th Depot Battalion, Geelong. On 12 July John was transferred to the 5th Reinforcements, 2nd Pioneer Battalion, Seymour. The unit embarked from Melbourne on 28 July 1916 per HMAT Karoo arriving in England on 15 November.

After a bout of illness John proceeded overseas to France on 28 February 1917 and was wounded in action on 5 May with a gunshot wound to the right foot. He was transferred to England for recovery. While there, in October, he failed to answer ‘C.C. calls’ and was detained for 7 days.

On 22 April 1918 John proceeded overseas back to France to the 7th Field Ambulance Brigade. He became ill and was admitted to hospital re-joining the unit on 15 July. Refusing to do duty and being absent from parade caused John to again be in trouble with authorities. Further illness kept John in England until his departure for Australia. During his return he once again found himself in strife by not returning to the ship on time before it left Cape Town. He was detained until he could board another ship, finally disembarking at Melbourne on 18 May 1919. John was discharged from the AIF, medically unfit due to ‘debility’ on 8 September 1919.

John married Emma Hope in 1922, they had a daughter and moved to New South Wales. He worked as a gardener until 1949 when he was working as a mechanic’s assistant. John died in 1955.

 

Anzac hatGeorge Arthur DALE

Service No:   5662
Rank:            Private
Unit:             14th Battalion, 18th Reinforcement

Born 1878, Geelong
Son of Henry and Harriett Dale from Connewarre
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a labourer

George enlisted 12/02/1916 at Geelong as a single man
He embarked for overseas 4/05/1915 from Melbourne on HMAT A17  Port Lincoln
Served in France
Returned to Australia 17/5/1919
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads
– Barrabool & Sth Barwon Shire
– Sth Barwon

After at first being rejected for defective teeth, George reapplied in February 1916 for active service with the AIF. He was appointed to the 14th Battalion, 18th Reinforcements training initially at Geelong before transferring to Broadmeadows. The unit embarked at Melbourne per HMAT Port Lincoln on 4 May 1916. Training continued in England until 14 October when the unit sailed for France and the Western Front with George attached to Head Quarters. At the time of arrival the battalion was taking part in bloody trench warfare.

Along with most of the 4th Brigade, the battalion suffered heavy losses at Bullecourt in April 1917 when the brigade attacked strong German positions without the promised tank support. It spent much of the remainder of 1917 in Belgium, advancing to the Hindenburg Line.

In March and April 1918, the battalion helped stop the German spring offensive. It subsequently participated in the great allied offensive of 1918, fighting near Amiens on 8 August 1918. This advance by British and empire troops was the greatest success in a single day on the Western Front, one that German General Erich Ludendorff described as “..the black day of the German Army in this war”…. The battalion continued operations until late September 1918, George was transferred to the 4th Infantry Brigade until he was transferred home in March 1919 via England, arriving at Melbourne on 12 May 1919 for demobilisation and discharge.

George returned home to Connewarre and worked as a labourer. He married Helen Barnett in 1927 and they lived in Connewarre until George died in 1957.

 

Anzac hatWilliam Alfred DALE

Service No:   3081
Rank:            Private
Unit:             21st Battalion, 7th Reinforcement

Born 1886, Leopold
Son of Henry and Harriett Dale from Connewarre East
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a labourer

William enlisted 13/07/1915 at Melbourne as a single man
He embarked for overseas 18/11/1915 from Melbourne on HMAT A18 Wiltshire
Served in Egypt, France, Belgium
Returned to Australia 15/9/1918
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads

William enlisted for active service with the AIF in July 1915. He had two years’ experience in the local Rifle Club making him the perfect candidate for army. He had twelve weeks training at the depot attached to the 7th Battalion, 7th Infantry Brigade, 21st Reinforcements. The unit embarked at Melbourne per HMAT Wiltshire on 15 October 1915. While undergoing further training in Egypt William was initially transferred to the 60th Battalion then transferred to the 5th Pioneer Battalion.

On 19 June 1916 the unit embarked to join the British Expeditionary Force in Marseilles. 14 December 1916 wounded slightly then contracted Trench Feet admitted to hospital initially in France then transferred to England for recover. Once well again he was stationed at the No 6 Infantry Base camp during February, March, and April attached to different units. In May 1917 William had joined the 66 Battalion. In October he was assigned to the 63rd Battalion and proceeded overseas to reinforce the 7th Battalion arriving in Belgium.

On 11 May 1918 he was severely wounded with a gunshot wound to his right foot causing him to be admitted to hospital then transferred to England before being invalided to Australia in September After the war William worked as a labourer and lived in Wallington until his death in 1957.

 

Anzac hatHarold Thorpe FULLER

Service No:   3103
Rank:            Private
Unit:             58th Infantry Battn

Born 1894, Black Flat Oakleigh
Son of Jacob and Caroline Fuller from Barwon Heads
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a farmer

Harold enlisted 17/07/1915 at Geelong as a single man
He embarked for overseas 26/11/1915 from Melbourne on HMAT A73 Commonwealth
Served in France
Returned to Australia 5/3/1919
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Freshwater Creek
– Barwon Heads
– Barrabool
– Barrabool & Sth Barwon Shire

Harold, a farmer, enlisted in July 1915 at Geelong. He was assigned to the 23rd Battalion at Broadmeadows with the rank of Private. The unit embarked from Melbourne on board HMAT Commonwealth on 26 November 1915.

While training in Egypt, on 23 February 1916 Harold was transferred to the 58th Battalion which embarked for France arriving on 23 March. He was admitted to hospital on 19 July in Boulogne with a gunshot wound to his back and neck. Subsequently he was invalided to England. Once recovered Harold was attached to a Depot in England with a bout of measles delaying his return to France.

On 27 April 1917 he re-joined his unit (58th Battalion) only to be wounded again on 11 May with multiple gunshot wounds. Invalided back to England to recover from a fractured Ulna caused by the gunshot wounds. After some leave, Harold proceeded back to France in November.

In January 1918. a bout of diarrhoea caused him to be in hospital for a month, re-joining his unit in March. In October he was attached to the 8th Tank Battalion British Expeditionary Force with the 58th Battalion, finding himself officially reported as a Prisoner of War in German hands on 5 November 1918. Harold was repatriated back to England arriving on 5 December 1918 finally disembarking in Australia on 25 April 1919.

Harold returned home to Connewarre working as a labourer before moving to Geelong after his marriage to Evelyn Gainger in 1922. Harold died at Heidelberg in 1961.

 

William Jacob FULLER

Service No:   1139
Rank:            Private
Unit:             5th Battalion, 1st Reinforcement

Born 1890, Mt Duneed
Son of Robert and Susannah Fuller from Connewarre East
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a farmer
William enlisted 21/09/1914 at Geelong as a single man
He embarked for overseas 22/12/1914 from Melbourne on HMAT A32 Themestosles
Served in Gallipoli
Killed in Action 25/4/1915
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads
– Barrabool & Sth Barwon Shire
– Sth Barwon

Connewarre farmer, William enlisted at the age of 23 years just a month after Australian volunteers were called for. Enlisting in Geelong he was attached to the 5th Battalion, 1st Reinforcements. The unit embarked from Melbourne on board the HMAT Themistocles on 22 December 1914. The ship sailed in across the Indian Ocean, bound for Egypt. By that time, the British commanders had decided to use the men initially to guard the Suez Canal against attack by the Turks, and then to send them to the Dardanelles as part of an Allied expeditionary force, hoping to knock Turkey out of the war.

The 5th Battalion was among the first infantry units raised for the AIF during the First World War. Like the 6th, 7th and 8th Battalions it was recruited from Victoria and, together with these battalions, formed the 2nd Brigade. The battalion was raised within a fortnight of the declaration of war in August 1914. The 1st Reinforcements arrived in Egypt around the start of February 1915 and joined the first contingent of the battalion at the Australian camp at Mena, near the Pyramids. It later took part in the ANZAC landing on 25 April 1915, as part of the second wave. It was during this landing that William was killed in action.

 

Anzac hat KIAAndrew Miller FULLER

Service No:   3538
Rank:            Private
Unit:             29th Battalion, 8th Reinforcement

Born 1884, Mt Duneed
Son of Robert and Susannah Fuller from Connewarre East
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a farmer

Andrew enlisted 17/04/1916 at Geelong as a single man
He embarked for overseas 1/08/1916 from Melbourne on HMAT A67 Orsova
Served in France
Killed in Action 26/9/1917
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Freshwater Creek
– Barwon Heads
– Barrabool & Sth Barwon Shire
– Sth Barwon

Nearly a year after his brother William was killed in action during the Gallipoli campaign, Andrew a farmer from Connewarre enlisted in the AIF on 3 April 1916. He was attached to 29th Battalion, 8th Reinforcements embarking for overseas service from Melbourne on 1 August 1916 aboard the HMAT Orsova arriving in France on 25 November.

In early 1917, the German Army withdrew to the Hindenburg Line, allowing the British front to be advanced. The Germans, however, made selected stands to delay this advance and the 28th Battalion was involved in defeating a counter-attack at Beaumetz on 23 March. The battalion subsequently missed the heavy fighting to breach the Hindenburg Line during the second battle of Bullecourt as the 8th Brigade was deployed to protect the Division’s flank. The only large battle in 1917 in which the 29th Battalion played a major role was Polygon Wood, fought in the Ypres sector in Belgium on 26 September. It was during this battle that Andrew was killed in action. Adding to the anxiety of Andrew’s family over loosing another son, his personal belongings were included in a consignment shipped from England per s.s. ‘Barunga’, which was lost at sea, with all cargo, as a result of enemy action.

 

Anzac hat KIAPercy George GRAHAM

Courtesy Aunty Grace via Jen Graham

Service No:   372
Rank:            Private
Unit:             8th Battalion, C Company

Born 1895, Mt Duneed
Son of John and Caroline Graham from Connewarre
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a farmer

Percy enlisted 24/08/1914 at Geelong as a single man
He embarked for overseas 19/10/1914 from Melbourne on HMAT A24 Benalla
Served in Egypt, Gallipoli
Killed in Action 2/5/1915
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads
– Barrabool & Sth Barwon Shire
– Sth Barwon

Nineteen year old Percy was one of the first from the Shire to enlist when recruiting offices opened on 10 August 2014. Hediary was allocated to the 8th Infantry Battalion embarking from Melbourne on board HMAT Benalla on 19 October 1914. After a brief stop in Albany, Western Australia, the battalion proceeded to Egypt, arriving on 2 December. It later took part in the ANZAC landing on 25 April 1915, as part of the second wave. Ten days after the landing, the 2nd Brigade was transferred from ANZAC to Cape Helles to help in the attack on the village of Krithia. The attack captured little ground but cost the brigade almost a third of its strength. Percy was one of the casualties of this campaign, he was killed in action on 2 May 1915, the last entry in his diary reads ” Sunday 2nd – Back to the trenches today, left about 10 a.m.”

 

 

 

Anzac hatHenry Gardiner GREEN

Contributed by Brian May

Contributed by Brian May

Service No:   217
Rank:            Driver
Unit:             46th Battalion, 1st Reinforcement

Born 1885, Mt Duneed
Son of John and Flora Green from Connewarre
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a farming

Henry enlisted 21/09/1914 at Geelong as a single man
He embarked for overseas 22/12/1914 from Melbourne on HMAT A32 Themestosles
Served in Gallipolli, Egypt, France
Returned to Australia 24/9/1918
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads
– Barrabool & Sth Barwon Shire
– Sth Barwon

Henry, a Connewarre farmer, enlisted for active service on 21 September 1914. He was appointed to the 6th Battalion and embarked from Melbourne on 22 December 1914 aboard HMAT Themistocles. The ship sailed in across the Indian Ocean, bound for Egypt. By that time, the British commanders had decided to use the men initially to guard the Suez Canal against attack by the Turks, and then to send them to the Dardanelles as part of an Allied expeditionary force, hoping to knock Turkey out of the war. Henry arrived at the Gallipoli Peninsula on 5 May 1915 sustaining a knee injury which kept him away from active service for 3 months.

After the withdrawal from Gallipoli, the battalion returned to Egypt, Henry suffered dysentery causing him to be hospitalized a few times and he was going to be transported back to Australia. In March 1916, Henry was transferred to the 46th Battalion. As part of the 12th Brigade of the 4th Australian Division, the 46th Battalion arrived in France on 8 June 1916, destined for the Western Front. It participated in its first major battle at Pozieres. Initially, the battalion provided carrying parties for supplies and ammunition during the 2nd Division’s attack on 4 August, and then, with its own division, defended the ground that had been captured. The46th endured two stints in the heavily contested trenches of Pozieres, as well as a period in reserve.

After Pozieres, the battalion spent the period up until March 1917 alternating between duty in the trenches and training and rest behind the lines. On 11 April it took part in the attack mounted against the heavily defended village of Bullecourt – part of the formidable Hindenburg Line to which the Germans had retreated during February and March. Devoid of surprise, and dependent upon the support of unreliable tanks, the attack had little chance of success; after managing to fight through to it’s objectives, the 46th was forced to withdraw with heavy casualties. Later in the year, the focus of the AIF’s operations switched to the Ypres sector in Belgium where the 46th took part in the battles of Messines and Passchendaele. Winter had a big impact on Henry’s health, from December 1917 to April 1918 He suffered impetigo and trench fever spending much of this period in hospital.

In the spring of 1918, his unit played a role in turning the great German offensive by defeating attacks around Dernancourt in the first days of April. During the Allied offensive that commenced in August, the 46th also played an active part, fighting in the battle of Amiens on 8 August. Shortly after this battle Henry embarked for Australia arriving per HT Devon disembarking at Melbourne on 23 November 1918.

Henry returned to the Connewarre farm, married Edith Clery in 1921 and they had a son. Henry continued farming until his death in 1947.

 

 

Anzac hatLeslie  HOPGOOD

Service No:   35064
Rank:            Gunner
Unit:             Field Artillery Brigade, Reinforcement 27

Born 1898, Barwon Heads
Son of Joseph and Edith Hopgood from Barwon Heads
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a farmer

Leslie enlisted 30/01/1917 at Geelong as a single man
He embarked for overseas 9/11/1917 from Melbourne on HMAT A15 Port Sydney
Served in France
Returned to Australia 3/7/1919
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads

As a young eighteen year old Leslie enlisted in the AIF on 2 February 1917. After initial training with the Recruiting Battalion at Royal Park he was transferred to the Field Artillery Reinforcements at Maribyrnong. His rank changed to Gunner as he was attached to the Field Artillery 37th Reinforcements in May. Leslie embarked from Melbourne on board HMAT Port Sydney on 9 November 1917 arriving in Egypt on 12 December on his way to England for further training.

On 13 March 1918 his unit proceeded overseas to France, on arrival Leslie was attached to the 8th Field Artillery Brigade, 3rd Division. He was appointed to the rank of Driver in May. The Brigade took part in the Capture of Hamel on 4 Jul 1918 followed by the battles of Amiens, Albert, Mont St.Quentin and The Hindenburg Line. On 3 April 1919 the 7th and 8th Field Artillery Brigades were amalgamated.

Leslie returned to Australia aboard Prinz Hubertus arriving on 24 August 1919 marrying Minnie Burton in 1922. In 1924 they lived in Dandenong with Leslie working as a carrier.

 

Anzac hatFrederick  JASPER

Service No:   3564
Rank:            Lance Corporal
Unit:             29th Battalion, 8th Reinforcement

Born 1895, Germantown
Son of Gottleib and Ernestine Jasper from Barwon Heads
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a farm Labourer

Frederick enlisted 17/04/1916 at Geelong as a single man
He embarked for overseas 1/08/1916 from Melbourne on HMAT A67 Orsova
Served in France
He was decorated with the Military Medal
Returned to Australia 9/7/1919
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads
– Barrabool & Sth Barwon Shire
– Sth Barwon

Frederick enlisted on 17 April 1916 undergoing training at Geelong with the 19th Depot Battalion. On 1 August he embarked from Melbourne on board HMAT Orsova with the 29th Battalion, 8th Reinforcement arriving in England six weeks later. After further intensive training he embarked overseas to France on 6 December 1916.

In early 1917, the German Army withdrew to the Hindenburg Line, allowing the British front to be advanced. The Germans, however, made selected stands to delay this advance and the 28th Battalion was involved in defeating a counter-attack at Beaumetz on 23 March. The battalion subsequently missed the heavy fighting to breach the Hindenburg Line during the second battle of Bullecourt as the 8th Brigade was deployed to protect the Division’s flank. The only large battle in 1917 in which the 29th Battalion played a major role was Polygon Wood, fought in the Ypres sector in Belgium on 26 September. In December, Frederick was wounded in action but remained on duty.

In January 1918 Frederick was awarded 2 days forfeiture of pay for disobeying a lawful command given by his superior officer. Then during “WYTSCHAETE Operations. On 20 March 1918 during a very heavy bombardment with gas and high explosive (HE) shells, Private JASPER worked the whole of the time with Gas Cases and on the same night worked for six hours as a Stretcher Bearer in his Gas Helmet. He was instrumental in saving the lives of several of his comrades.”

SAILLY-le-SEC Operations. During these operations he carried three wounded men in from No Man’s Land under very heavy Machine gun and artillery fire. On the 15th May 1918 a British Aeroplane crashed into No Man’s Land and in broad daylight Private JASPER with another man went out and brought the wounded Aviator in.”  Source: ‘Commonwealth Gazette’ No. 75   Date: 17 June 1919

The 29th fought in a minor attack at Morlancourt on 29 July, and then in August and September took part in the great advance that followed the battle of Amiens. “During the advance at Morlancourt on 28th July 1918 he carried in wounded continuously for 8 hours. Artillery barrages were intense throughout. Then at “VAUVILLERS 8th/9th August 1918. On 9th August three men were wounded whilst advancing from one mound to another. The Machine gun fire was intense and scarcely a man got through but Private JASPER went out and brought the three men in to shelter. ETERPIGNY Operations 28th/29th August 1918. On 29th August 1918 Private JASPER went out under point blank artillery fire and intense Machine Gun fire and carried three seriously wounded men to shelter.” Source: ‘Commonwealth Gazette’ No. 75  Date: 17 June 1919

The 29th fought its last major action in September when the 5th and 3rd Australian Divisions, and two American divisions attacked the Hindenburg Line across the top of the 6-kilometre-long St Quentin Canal tunnel; the canal was a major obstacle in the German defensive scheme. The offensive of 1918, however, had strained the AIF almost to breaking point. Just prior to the disbandment of the Battalion, Frederick was wounded in action again. He had a gunshot wound to the left ear and was hospitalized for a week. On 12 October the 29th Battalion was disbanded to provide reinforcements for other 8th Brigade units consequently Frederick was transferred to the 5th Division Train and was appointed to Lance Corporal.

On 13 March 1919 Frederick was awarded the Military Medal for his gallantry and bravery in the field during 1918. He returned to Australia on July 1919.

 

Anzac hatAlexander  LENNOX

Service No:   2685
Rank:            2nd Corporal
Unit:             29th Battalion, 5th Reinforcement

Born 1877, Geelong
Son of William and Eliza Lennox from Geelong
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a labourer

Alexander enlisted 17/01/1916 at Prahran as a single man
He embarked for overseas 14/03/1916 from Melbourne on HMAT A68 Anchises
Served in France
Returned to Australia 11/5/1919
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads

Training with the 19th Depot Battalion at the Broadmeadows camp began for Alexander on 2 February 1916 until 5 March 1916 when he was transferred to the 29th Battalion 5th Reinforcements just prior to embarking from Melbourne aboard the HMAT Anchises on 14 March 1916. The unit disembarked in Egypt on 15 April for intensive training arriving in France destined for the Western Front on 8 August. The 29th Battalion fought its first major battle at Fromelles on 19 July 1916. The nature of this battle was summed up by one 29th soldier: “the novelty of being a soldier wore off in about five seconds, it was like a bloody butcher’s shop”. Although it still spent periods in the front line, the 29th played no major offensive role for the rest of the year. In December, during the French winter, Alexander suffered a few serious bouts of influenza causing him to be hospitalized each time.

On 9 February 1917 Alexander was transferred to the recently formed 1st Anzac Light Railway Unit which was initially part of the Engineers. Light railways played an important part in WW1 in France. In the environment of the Western Front, main line railways could get no closer than five to eight kilometres from the trenches, as they were a prime target for artillery and were very expensive to install and maintain. Narrow gauge ‘light railways’ served as the vital connection between the main line railheads and the forward areas.

On 14 February 1918 Alexander was promoted to temporary 2nd Corporal. On 7 March 1918 he joined the 3rd Australian Light Rail company which he stayed with until the end of the war when he was attached to the 4th Railway Company on 9 October 1918 during clean up. Alexander returned to Australia on 27 June 1919.

Post war, Alexander lived in Melbourne suburbs working as a labourer. He died at Moonee Ponds on 15 January 1940.

 

Anzac hatGeorge  LOWE

http://vic.ww1anzac.com/

vic.ww1anzac.com

Service No:   902
Rank:            Corporal
Unit:             8th Light Horse Regiment, 5th Reinforcement

Born 1891, Blackpool, England
Son of George and Annie Lowe from England
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a golf professional

George enlisted 2/12/1914 at Geelong as a single man
He embarked for overseas 7/05/1915 from Melbourne on HMAT A56 Palermo
Served in Gallipoli, Middle East
Returned to Australia 3/7/1919
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads

George was born in Blackpool, Lancashire, England the son a Scottish/English professional golfer. A naturally talented golfer, upon leaving school unsurprisingly he became a professional golfer appointed in 1909 at the Old Manchester Golf Club, considered the second oldest in England, but during 1911 was advised by doctors to move to warmer climates due to bronchial trouble. He decided to immigrate to Australia, arriving in 1912. His older brother Stewart (aka Alex) also a golf professional and greenkeeper joined him. George first worked as a jackeroo before a position at Colac, then Barwon Heads Golf Club (1912) became available. He was the golf professional at the Geelong Golf Club in 1913/14, holding both the positions concurrently. George enlisted at Geelong with the AIF on 26 November 1914 and was attached to the 5th Reinforcements of the 8th Light Horse Battalion at Broadmeadows.

On 7 May 1915 the unit embarked for active service from Melbourne on board HMAT Palermo. Eventually they landed on the Gallipoli Peninsula on 7 August 1915. The light horse were considered unsuitable for the initial operations at Gallipoli, but were subsequently deployed without their horses. The 8th formed the first two waves for the Brigade’s disastrous attack on the Nek on 7 August and suffered heavily. Recurring dysentery affected George for the first time in September and he was invalided from Gallipoli in October and transferred to Malta then England by which stage enteritis had also set in.

By January winter had set in affecting George severely. On 18 January 1916 he hospitalized for pneumonia taking quite a while to recover. Once George was fully recovered he re-joined the unit, who were back in Egypt. In March 1916, the unit joined the forces defending the Suez Canal from a Turkish drive across the Sinai Desert. The Turks were turned at Romani. Although it didn’t take part in the actual battle, the 8th Light Horse participated in the advance that followed the Turks’ retreat back across the desert. After another stay in hospital George was discharged on 15 September 1916 and transferred to 6th Battalion at 2nd Training Camp at Perham Downs for complete recovery. However another bronchial attach caused him to be admitted to hospital again on 27 November 1916.

As full recovery was near George was transferred back to the 8th Light Horse Regiment on 22 February 1917 arriving in March at Egypt marching into the isolation camp at Moascar for a month. He subsequently attached to the 3rd Light Horse Training Regiment which was involved in a stint of protective duty along the line of communications through the Sinai. The unit was then involved in the abortive second battle of Gaza on 19 April. Gaza finally fell on 7 November, after a wide outflanking move via Beersheba, in which the 1st Light Horse Brigade played a part. George’s health started to fail again with further hospitalization for bronchial issues as winter closed. He was transferred to the 8th Light Horse Regiment on 3 January 1918, then subsequently detached to attend cookery school in the March, returning month later. George succumbed to further attacks of diarrhoea and was infected with Malaria before returning to Australia on 7 August 1919.

George had considered settling in British East Africa after war’s end but the Geelong Golf Club requested he return, having kept the job open for him during his absence, as did Barwon Heads. He married Edith Barnett in 1920, they were to have three children. George’s career flourished as he developed golf courses around Melbourne and regional Victoria. He held committee positions at the Long Island golf club at Frankston which he relinquished toward the end of 1938 having decided to move his family to a farm he had purchased at Lillico via Warragul. He continued to work as a golf professional holding the position at Warragul Golf Club for 22 years. He also continue to advise on the design of new golf courses. George provided a distinguished service to the game of golf as a professional, course builder and course designer. He died at Warragul in 1974.

 

Anzac hatNorman Leo Lawrence McDONALD

Service No:   71
Rank:            Lance Corporal
Unit:             8th Light Horse Regiment, A Squadron

Born 1890, Connewarre
Son of Donald and Catherine McDonald from Connewarre
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a labourer

Norman enlisted 12/09/1914 at Geelong as a single man
He embarked for overseas 25/02/1915 from Melbourne on HMAT A16 Star of Victoria
Served in Gallipoli, Egypt
Returned to Australia 26/7/1919
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads
– Barrabool & Sth Barwon Shire
– Sth Barwon

Norman enlisted at the start of the war on 12 September 1914 a week before his younger brother. He was assigned to the ‘A’ Squadron 8th Light Horse Regiment embarking from Melbourne aboard HMAT Star of Victoria on 25 February 1915. They arrive at Alexandria in Egypt on 14 March 1915. On 15 May 1915, the 8th Light Horse received orders to proceed to Gallipoli, and they embarked at Alexandria for Gallipoli on 16 May 1915 per H.M.T. Menominee. All of their horses were left behind at Heliopolis under the care of one officer and 30 men. The 8th Light Horse landed at Kota Tepe (on Gallipoli) on the night of 21 May 1915, and took up positions at Walker’s Top. The 8th formed the first two waves for the Brigade’s disastrous attack on the Nek on 7 August and suffered heavily. Norman was admitted to hospital with influenza on 11 August while the regiment played a defensive role in the campaign. They finally left the peninsula on 20 December 1915.

Back in Egypt in 1916, the 8th took part in defending the Suez Canal from a Turkish drive across the Sinai Desert. The Turks were turned at Romani. Although it didn’t take part in the actual battle, the 8th Light Horse participated in the advance that followed the Turks’ retreat back across the desert. In September Norman was promoted to Lance Corporal. Later in the year the unit was involved in the fighting to secure the Turkish outpost of Maghdaba on 23 December, which was captured at bayonet point.

The next Turkish stronghold to be encountered was Gaza in March and April 1917. Norman was hospitalized in August, returning to duty in November to be involved with the unit in the wide outflanking move via Beersheba that began on 31 October. With the fall of Gaza on 7 November 1917, the Turkish position in southern Palestine collapsed. The 8th participated in the pursuit that followed and led to the capture of Jerusalem in December.

The focus of British operations then moved to the Jordan Valley. In early May 1918 the 8th was involved in the Es Salt raid. It was a tactical failure but did help to convince the Turks that the next offensive would be launched across the Jordan. Instead, the offensive was launched along the coast on 19 September 1918. The mounted forces penetrated deep into the Turkish rear areas severing roads, railways and communications links. The 8th Light Horse took part in the capture of Tiberius on 25 September and Sasa on 29 September. It entered Damascus on 1 October, and was resting in Homs when the Turks surrendered on 31 October. While waiting to embark for home, the regiment was called back to operational duty to quell the Egyptian revolt that erupted in March 1919; order was restored in little over a month. Norman sailed for home on 26July 1919.

Once home he married Olive Thorley in 1921 and moved to Dreeite, near Beeac where he worked as a farmer until his death in 1974.

 

 

Anzac hat KIAJohn Alex MCDONALDWeb Conne-McDonald JA 2145

Service No:   2145
Rank:            Private
Unit:             6th Battalion, 1st Reinforcements

Born 1892, Geelong
Son of Donald and Catherine McDonald from Connewarre
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a farmer

John enlisted 21/09/1914 at Geelong as a single man
He embarked for overseas 5/04/1915
Served in Gallipoli
Killed in Action 8/5/1915
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads
– Barrabool & Sth Barwon Shire
– Sth Barwon

John enlisted on 17 September 1914 at the beginning of the war. He was attached to the 6th Battalion, 1st Reinforcements and training at Broadmeadows. On 22 December 1914 he embarked from Melbourne aboard HMAT Themistocles. The ship sailed in across the Indian Ocean, bound for Egypt arriving early February.

After intensive training the 6th Battalion landed at Gallipoli as part of the 2nd wave on the 25th April; While attempting to hold back the Turks John was initially reported on 8 May 1915 as being wounded, then reported as wounded and missing. He was pronounced killed in action by a Court of Enquiry held on 24 April 1916. In 1920 his body was found in a Turkish Cemetery at Pine Ridge, exhumed and re-interred in the Lone Pine Cemetery, Gallipoli.

 

 

Anzac hatAustin  McDONALD

Service No:   3581
Rank:            Private
Unit:             29th Battalion, 8th Reinforcement

Born 1896, Belmont
Son of Donald and Catherine McDonald from Connewarre
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a farmer

Austin enlisted 17/04/1916 at Geelong as a single man
He embarked for overseas 1/08/1916 from Melbourne on HMAT A67 Orsova
Served in France

Returned to Australia 19/2/1919
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads
– Barrabool & Sth Barwon Shire
– Sth Barwon

Austin, Connewarre farmer, enlisted in the AIF on 17 April 1916. He was posted as a member of the 8th reinforcements for the 29th Battalion to train at Geelong. They embarked from Melbourne for England on 1 August 1916 on board HMAT Orsova. By the time the Orsova reached Plymouth in the September an old ulcer had reappeared on Austin’s shin causing him to go to hospital, he re-joined the unit a month later. On 5 December 1916 Austin proceeded overseas for the Western Front on board the SS Princess Victoria from Folkestone.

After wintering in the mud of the Western Front, the 29th entered the fighting of 1917 against the German defensive positions forward of the Hindenburg Line. The Battalion’s aggressive and decisive action particularly at Sunray Trench contributed to the German withdrawal to the Hindenburg Line. The 29th Battalion played a major role at Polygon Wood, where they fought in the Ypres sector in Belgium on 26 September. During this battle Austin was wounded in action. Here the Battalion excelled despite poor communication from higher authorities. While stationed at the hospital and still recovering from the injury, Austin went AWL overnight and his punishment was the loss of ten days pay for his crime. He re-joined his unit from hospital on 22 December, however he returned to hospital two weeks later to be discharged in April 1918.

When the Allies took to the offensive again, the 29th fought in a minor attack at Morlancourt on 29 July, and then in August and September took part in the great advance that followed the battle of Amiens. During this advance on 9 August 1918 Austin was wounded in action with a gunshot wound to the head. He was admitted to hospital and invalided to England for recovery. On the 4 December 1918 Austin was transferred to 5th Battalion before returning to Australia. On 31 March 1919 he disembarked in Melbourne.

Austin returned to Connewarre for a short time. In 1924 he was a labourer living in Dreeite with his brother Norman. He died in 1955.

 

Anzac hatWilliam Hector McINNES

Service No:   7148
Rank:            Private
Unit:             8th Battalion, 23rd Reinforcement

Born 1887, Breakwater
Son of Lawrence and Mary McInnes from Connewarre East
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a framer

William enlisted 3/11/1916 at Geelong as a single man
He embarked for overseas 23/11/1916 from Melbourne on HMAT A20 Hororata
Served in France
Returned to Australia 19/8/1919
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads

William, Connewarre farmer, enlisted for the second time on 24 October 1916 at Geelong. He previously had been rejected on medical grounds. William was attached to the 2nd Reinforcements to the 8th Battalion training at Royal Park. The unit embarked from Melbourne on board HMAT Hororata on 23 November 1916 disembarking at Plymouth, England on 29 January 1917. Two weeks after landing William was admitted to hospital with laryngitis and while there contracted the mumps. On 20 September William proceeded overseas to France and upon landing transferred to the 23rd Battalion. He joined the unit just as the battalion moved with the rest of the AIF to the Ypres sector in Belgium, and in October participated in the battle to secure Broodseinde Ridge.

In April 1918 the 23rd helped to turn back the German spring offensive, and then took part in the battles that would mark the beginning of Germany’s defeat – Hamel, Amiens and Mont St Quentin. During the campaign on 1 September 1918 William was wounded by a gunshot wound to his right buttock and discharged from hospital on 23 September re-joining his unit on 20 October. It was resting when armistice was declared on 11 November. Just prior to the disbanding of the 23rd Battalion William was attached to the Australian Base Depot on 12 April 1919.

William returned to Australia on 9 October 1919 and married Phoebe Doig in 1923. They had a daughter and the family moved to Nile, Tasmania where William farmed. He died in 1969 at Launceston.

 

 

Anzac hatEdward Victor MIDDLETON

contributed by Brian May

contributed by Brian May

Service No:   1936
Rank:            Sergeant
Unit:             58th Battalion, 3rd Reinforcement

Born 6/10/1891, Connewarre
Son of William and Louisa Middleton from Connewarre
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a dairy farmer

Edward enlisted 22/02/1916 at Geelong as a single man
He embarked for overseas 8/07/1916 from Melbourne on HMAT A31 Ajana
Served in France
He was Mentioned in Dispatches
Returned to Australia 6/11/1918
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads

Edward, Connewarre dairy farmer, enlisted in Geelong with the AIF on 22 February 1916 and initially appointed 19th Depot Battalion training at Geelong. He moved through the ranks quickly in training – acting Corporal, acting Lance Corporal. Subsequently allocated to D Company, 3rd Reinforcements for the 58th Battalion on 25 April 1916. Edward embarked from Melbourne on 8 July aboard the HMAT Ajana, disembarking at Devonport on 31 August. He marched into the 15th Training Battalion, Hurdcott camp.

On 14 June 1917 Edward proceeded overseas to France joining the 58th Battalion in the field and was promoted to Sergeant on 30 August. With the AIF’s focus of operations switched to the Ypres sector in Belgium the 58th’s major battle was at Polygon Wood on 26 September. An order was received on 9 October at 2am to move toward the support area on Westhoek Ridge via Shrapnel Corner – Hellfire Corner – Menin Road. They arrived and occupied the trenches running north-south. The next day they buried cable with the task completed by midday. In the afternoon the enemy began shelling the positon aided by an observation balloon and air support. The main task for the 58th was to lay the cable, erection of shelters and draining trenches as well as provide relief for the 29th Battalion. During the night (11.10.17) the enemy shelled the sector heavily with high explosive (HE) shells. At 5am the next day the artillery put over a barrage in front of Broodseinde to support the infantry attack. The constant heavy shelling delayed working parties burying cable and laying barbed wire. However duckboards had to be carried forward. During these operations and bombardment Edward was wounded in action by a gunshot wound to his right thigh and left elbow. He was admitted to hospital and on 24 October transferred to England. While in recovery Edward received word that the 1st Anzac Army Corps Commander expressed appreciation of gallant services rendered during recent operations at Polygon Wood.

By 4 March 1918 he was fully recovered from his wounds and proceeded overseas to France re-joining the 58th Battalion near Ville-Sur-Ancre. On 18 June, for the second time Edward was wounded in action, this time with a gunshot wound to right foot resulting in a compound fracture of the cuboid and scaphoid bones. He was transferred back to England a week later and subsequently invalided back to Australia on 6 November on hospital transport “Maraton” for return to Australia reaching Melbourne on 1 January 1919.

He returned to working as a grazier at Cororooke marrying Jean Hill in 1922. Together they had a daughter and continued living in Cororooke until his death in 1984.

 

 

Anzac hatAlfred William RAYFIELDWeb Conne - Rayfield

Service No:   275
Rank:            Private
Unit:             Machine Gun Company 10, Reinforcement 2

Born 1891, Grayesend, England
Son of James and Ann Rayfield from England
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a barman

Alfred enlisted 27/04/1916 at Melbourne as a single man
He embarked for overseas 16/08/1916 from Melbourne on RMS Orontes
Served in France
Returned to Australia 6/9/1919
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads

Alfred, a barman at the Mt. Colite Hotel Barwon Heads, enlisted at Melbourne on 27 April 1916. He was appointed to training at Seymour with the 2nd Reinforcements of the 10th Machine Gun Company and assigned to the 10th Infantry Brigade. The unit embarked from Melbourne on 16 August aboard HMAT Orontes arriving in England on 3 October and allocated to No 3 training camp Parkhouse. After intensive training it crossed to France on 18 November. The Division was commanded by Major General John Monash, who went on to command the entire Australian Corps and is still regarded as one of the finest military commanders of the World War.

In 1917, the Australian 3rd Division participated in a number of major battles in France and Belgium including Messines, Polygon Wood, Broodseinde and Passchendaele. Each company within the Battalion was equipped with 16 Vickers machine guns, giving the 3rd Machine Gun Battalion a total of 64. Each gun required a six to eight man crew – one to fire, one to load and the rest to help carry the gun, ammunition and spare parts. The Vickers machine gun was capable of firing up to 450 rounds per minute and had an effective range of around 4 kilometres!

In February 1918, the 10th Machine Gun Company was absorbed into the 3rd Machine Gun Battalion which was attached to the Australian 3rd Division, saw action in Ypres in Belgium, in the Somme during the German’s spring offensive, and later that year, as part of the allies’ 100 day offensive around Amiens, France. Private Alfred William Rayfield served continuously in France and Belgium (other than for short periods of leave) between November 1916 and May 1919. He returned to Australia per HT Berrima embarking on 6 September 1919 with his mother and father. They disembarked in Melbourne on 2 November 1919.
Within weeks of returning to Australia he married Maude Daniels, they made their home in Caulfield with Alfred working as a storeman. In 1931 James Rayfield (father) was living with Alfred and Maude at Caulfield. Alfred died in 1935.

 

 

Anzac hat KIAWilliam John SCOTT

Service No:   4916
Rank:            Lance Corporal
Unit:             58th Battalion

Born 1894, Mt Duneed
Son of William and Elizabeth Scott from Connewarre
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a labourer

William enlisted 13/09/1915 at Geelong as a single man
He embarked for overseas 7/03/1916 from Melbourne on HMAT A18 Wiltshire
Served in France
Killed in Action 9/8/1918
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads
– Barrabool & Sth Barwon Shire
– Sth Barwon

William enlisted on 13 September 1915 at Geelong completing his initial training at Geelong and later at Broadmeadows. He departed Melbourne aboard HMAT Wilshire on March 7 as a reinforcement for the 15th Battalion. He arrived in Egypt in April and was transferred to the 58th Battalion. After intensive training William left Egypt for France arriving in June. The following month William soon found himself in action sustaining a gunshot wound to the face and shock during the catastrophic battle of Fromelles. Three weeks later he was back in action rejoining his unit on 15 August however an inflammation of the middle ear caused him to be readmitted back to hospital. He briefly rejoined the unit in October before developing Trench Feet in December and spending another week in hospital.

Early in 1917 the 58th battalion participated in the advance that followed the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, but it was spared from the assault. During this operation on 26 March William was wounded in action for the second occasion, this time a gunshot wound to the right elbow. He was transferred to England for medical attention. In May he proceeded overseas back to France and joined his unit on 16 June. When the Allies launched an offensive around Amiens on 8 August, the 58th Battalion was amongst the units in action, although its role in the subsequent advance was limited. The battalion was involved in the fighting to secure Peronne at the beginning of September. On 4 October William was appointed Lance Corporal, the same day the Army Corps Commander expressed appreciation of the gallant services William rendered during a recent operation.

The Hundred Days Offensive was the final period of the First World War, during which the Allies launched a series of offensives against the Central Powers on the Western Front from 8 August to 11 November 1918, beginning with the Battle of Amiens. The offensive essentially pushed the Germans out of France, forcing them to retreat beyond the Hindenburg Line, and was followed by an armistice. The term “Hundred Days Offensive” does not refer to a specific battle or unified strategy, but rather the rapid series of Allied victories starting with the Battle of Amiens. On the 9 August the 58th role was to attack in a south-easterly direction toward Chaulnes with Vauvillers on their left in support of the Battle of Amiens. They sustained heavy casualties including William Scott who was killed in action.

 

Anzac hatGeorge Tait SCOTT

Service No:   3635
Rank:            Private
Unit:             22nd Battalion, 8th Reinforcement

Born 10/3/1896, Mt Duneed
Son of William and Elizabeth Scott from Connewarre
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a farmer

George enlisted 22/07/1915 at Geelong as a single man
He embarked for overseas 5/01/1916 from Melbourne on HMAT A19 Afric
Served in Western Front
Returned to Australia 18/5/1919
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads
– Barrabool & Sth Barwon Shire
– Sth Barwon

On a small piece of paper, parents Elizabeth and William wrote their consent for George to enlist in the Expeditionary Force. He did so on 22 July 1915 as a 19 year old Connewarre farmer, joining the 22nd Infantry Battalion as a Private. He began his training at Geelong before being transferred to Broadmeadows in November.

His unit embarked from Melbourne on board HMAT Afric on 5 January 1916. On arrival in Egypt (24 February) George was transferred initially to the 57th Battalion, then shortly after to the 58th Battalion. On 23 March the unit arrived in France becoming embroiled in its first major battle on the Western Front at Fromelles on 19 July. The battle was a disaster. The 58th had the dual role of providing carrying parties and a reserve force. The reserve force (approximately half of the battalion) was ordered to attack late in the battle and was virtually annihilated by machine-gun fire; as a whole, the 58th suffered casualties equal to almost a third of its strength. George was wounded in this battle. Firstly it was reported that he had been shot in the back and axilla, then later it was his chest, he was eventually invalided back to England. In October, while stationed at Perham Downs for recuperation, George went AWL for three days and awarded 7 days confined to camp (CC) and forfeited 4 days pay. It was another twelve months before he re-joined his unit.

During March 1917, while still based in England, he was allocated to the 65th Battalion. However on 21 September George went back to France to reinforce 58th Battalion, joining the unit on 2 October. After the major battle of Polygon Wood which the 58th was involved they joined the great offensive launched to the east of Ypres. The 58th was ordered to relieve the 8th Battalion on 25 October. The next day there was heavy shelling all morning and at 8pm an order was received to send out patrols with the object of ascertaining the condition of pill boxes situated front of their line. It was on this day that George was wounded for a second time and sent to hospital.

George re-joined his unit on 5 January 1918 from hospital. Influenza in April had sent him to hospital again and while there he developed impetigo. He was discharged in July re-joining the 58th Battalion in the field. George was sent to hospital on 2 September with NYDN. In 1917, the term shell- shock was no longer allowed. Men were classified as Not Yet Diagnosed Nervous (NYDN). The men called it Not Yet Dead Nearly. A week later the diagnosis was concussion! After a month in hospital George returned to his unit only to be readmitted to hospital with influenza and again re-joining his unit in January 1919.

With the armistice signed and the war over, George returned to Australia on 8 May 1919. Once home he married Elsie and they lived and farmed in Connewarre until George’s death in 1952.

 

 

Anzac hatAlexander Ewing SPENCER

Service No:   1967
Rank:            Private
Unit:             58th Battalion, 3rd Reinforcement

Born 1889, Strathbogie
Son of William and Frances Spencer from Connewarre
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a farm Labourer

Alexander enlisted 29/02/1916 at Geelong as a single man
He embarked for overseas 8/07/1916 from Melbourne on HMAT A31 Ajana
Served in France
Returned to Australia 15/5/1919
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads
– Barrabool & Sth Barwon Shire
– Sth Barwon

Alexander enlisted on 29 February 1916, and was allocated to the 3rd Reinforcements for the 58th Battalion. He trained at Broadmeadows before embarking from Melbourne aboard HMAT Ajana on 8 July. They arrived at England on 31 August 1916. With some further training behind him, Alexander sailed with his unit to France on 6 December.

Things were quiet initially, then early in 1917 the 58th battalion participated in the advance that followed the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, but it was spared from the assault. It did, however, defend gains made during the second battle of Bullecourt, between 9 and 12 May. Alexander suffered a gunshot wound to the right thigh and was admitted to hospital, eventually being invalided out if France and admitted to 1st London General Hospital on 29 May. He was again admitted to hospital in August for the treatment of Trench Feet. He re-joined his unit in October at the time of the collapse of Russia.

Alexander began the new year with a transfer to the 15th Infantry Brigade at Brigade Head Quarters re-joining the 58th Battalion in October just after it withdrew from the front line for a rest. It was still resting when the war ended.

He marched out of France for return to Australia in March 1919 as the battalion merged with the 59th Battalion. He sailed from England on 15 May 1919 aboard the Orontes, disembarking at Melbourne 29 June. Once home Alexander returned to living at Connewarre and farming. He died in 1972.

 

Anzac hatRobert Blyth SPENCER

Service No:   2781
Rank:            Private
Unit:             24th Battalion, 6th Reinforcement

Born 1891, Strathbogie
Son of William and Frances Spencer from Connewarre
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a labourer

Robert enlisted 27/07/1915 at Geelong as a single man
He embarked for overseas 27/10/1915 from Melbourne on HMAT A38 Ulysses
Served in France
Returned to Australia 13/4/1919
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads
– Barrabool & Sth Barwon Shire
– Sth Barwon

Robert was twenty four years old when he enlisted on 17 July 1915 to join the AIF, one of a record 36,575 men to sign up that month. He was allocated to the 6th Reinforcements of the 24th Infantry Battalion and sent to Broadmeadows to undergo his training. While at the training camp he married Ivy Fuller. He duly sailed for the Middle East on HMAT Ulysses leaving Melbourne on 27 October 1915. Arriving in Egypt in early December, Robert was not sent to Gallipoli as the Allied high command had already decided to leave the peninsula at the end of the month. Instead there was reorganisation of the battalions to focus on the Western Front.

The 24th Infantry Battalion and Robert sailed for France on 21 March 1916 taking part in its first major offensive around Pozieres and Mouquet Farm in July and August. The Battalion got little rest during the bleak winter of 1916-17 alternating between the front and labouring tasks. When patrolling no-man’s land the men of the 24th adopted a unique form of snow camouflage – large white nighties bought in Amiens.

In May 1917 the battalion participated in the successful, but costly, second battle of Bullecourt. It was involved for only a single day ‘ 3 May ‘ but suffered almost 80 per cent casualties. Robert soon after transferred to the 1st Anzac Corps School where he stayed for twelve months, probably as an instructor. The Anzac Corps School was at Aveluy, in France. The school ran courses on subjects such as bombing, Lewis guns, trench mortars and signalling.

When Robert returned to his battalion in August 1918, the 24th was preparing for the battle at Mont St Quentin where it played a major role by recapturing the main German strong point atop the summit on 1 September. The battalion’s last battles of the war were at Beaurevoir on 3 October and Montbrehain on 5 October. It left the front line for the last time on 6 October 1918.

Robert returned to Australia in April 1919 and to the farm at Connewarre. The following year Robert and Ivy’s son Harold was born in 1920, he died the same year. Sadly Ivy died in 1927 and Robert married Lillie Tink in 1930. In 1936 Robert was a farmer, living with Lillie at the Soldier Settlement, Bookar in the Camperdown area. He continued living in Camperdown until his death in March 1972.

 

Anzac hatWilliam George TAIT

Service No:   7149
Rank:            Private
Unit:             8th Battalion, 23rd Reinforcement

Born 1890, Mt Duneed
Son of George and Mary Tait from Barwon Heads
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a farmer

William enlisted 24/10/1916 at Geelong as a single man
He embarked for overseas 23/11/1916 from Melbourne on HMAT A20 Hororata
Served in France
Returned to Australia 4/1/1919
His name is listed on the following memorials / honour boards:
– Barwon Heads
– Barrabool & Sth Barwon Shire
– Sth Barwon

On William’s first application for enlistment in the AIF, he was rejected because of his teeth. William then enlisted on 22 July 1915 but was discharged in November having been found medically unfit due to heart disease. A third application on 24 October 1916 saw him finally accepted into the AIF and attached to the 23rd Reinforcement of the 8th Battalion. After completing four weeks basic training William embarked from Melbourne aboard HMAT Hororata on 23 November 1916. He disembarked at Plymouth, England on 29 January 1917.

With further intensive training in England William proceeded overseas to France on 29 May 1917 joining the 8th Battalion AIF in August. The battalion was participating in the operations that followed-up the German withdrawal to the Hindenburg Line. They returned to Belgium to join the great offensive launched to the east of Ypres. William became ill on 15 September with PUO (Pyrexia of Unknown Origin) the medical term usually applied to Trench Fever. A month later he was transferred to England for treatment.

In May 1918 William proceeded overseas to France, and re-joined the 8th Battalion a week later. They had just held back the Germans in their spring offensive. The battalion then participated in the allies’ own spring offensive, launched near Amiens on 8 August 1918. The advance by British and empire troops was the greatest success in a single day on the Western Front, one that German General Erich Ludendorff described as, “the black day of the German Army in this war”. Two days after this action William was wounded with gunshot wound to his right arm and leg subsequently invalided to the U.K two weeks later. In October he was discharged to the Com. Depot, Weymouth before returning to Australia per Morvada on 4 January 1919.

After returning to the farm at Connewarre William married Ruth Lloyd in 1921. The moved to Dreeite where William worked as a farmer until 1949 when they shifted to Newtown. In 1954 William died.

 


Names not on Honour Board

 


 

sailor hat2Alfred Henry BENSCH

Service No:    4331
Rank:             Officer Cook II
Unit:               Royal Australian Navy

Born 8/1/1897, Geelong
Son of John and Elizabeth Bensch from Geelong

Alfred enlisted on 19/12/1914 as a 17 year old single man

He served as a cook at the Royal Australian Navy College which was located at Geelong and subsequently moved to Jervis Bay in 1915.

 

 

Anzac hatGeorge Eric CAMPBELL

Service No:    499
Rank:             Sergeant
Unit:               Army Provost Corps

Born 1/1/1896, Rosevale, NSW
Son of John and Maria Campbell from Connewarre
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a cheesemaker

George enlisted 9/03/1915 at Colac as a single man
He embarked for overseas 10/05/1915 from Melbourne on HMAT A38 Ulysses
Served in Gallipoli, France
Discharged in England

 

 

Alfred FULLER

Service No:
Rank:             Private
Unit:               –

Born 1892, Black Flat Oakleigh
Son of Jacob and Caroline Fuller from Barwon Heads
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a farmer

Alfred enlisted 17/07/1915 at Geelong as a single man
He was soon discharged as medically unfit

On enlistment Alfred was attached to the 89th Training Company at Seymour. While there he had an appendix operation and it became apparent that a bout of pleurisy three years earlier had affected his aerobic capacity. Hear murmurs were also identified resulting in a decision by the medical board that Alfred was unfit for active service based on his heart condition.

 

 

Anzac hatHenry Arthur HARKNESS

Service No:    57433
Rank:             Private
Unit:               4th General Service Reinforcements (Egypt)

Born 1890, Connewarre
Son of Andrew and Bridget Harkness from Garvoc, Vic
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a labourer

Henry enlisted 10/04/1918 at Terrang as a married man
He embarked for overseas 17/08/1918 from Sydney on HMAT A15 Port Sydney
Served in Egypt
Returned to Australia 28/6/1919

 

 

Anzac hatVictor William LEWIS

Service No:    81489
Rank:             Private
Unit:               Recruit Depot Battalion

Born 28/6/1897, Connewarre
Son of William and Ellen Lewis from Moolap
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a labourer

Victor enlisted 2/11/1918 at Melbourne as a single man

He served for 53 days before being discharged as a result of the demobilization of the AIF.

 

 

Anzac hatHorace Napier MacKENZIE

Service No:    5653
Rank:             Private
Unit:               23rd Battalion, 15th Reinforcement

Born 1891, Koo-wee-rup
Son of George and Grace MacKenzie from Connewarre State School
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a printer

Horace enlisted 13/04/1916 at Melbourne as a single man
He embarked for overseas 25/09/1916 from Melbourne on HMAT A9 Shropshire
Served in France
Returned to Australia 31/3/1919

 

 

Anzac hatJames  MACKRELL

Service No:    5368
Rank:             Private
Unit:               21st Battalion, 14th Reinforcement

Born 15/11/1867, Connewarre
Son of William and Agnes Mackrell from Merton, Vic
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a farmer

James enlisted 15/03/1916 at Melbourne as a married man
He embarked for overseas 28/07/1916 from Melbourne on HMAT A32 Themestosles
Served in France
Returned to Australia 4/5/1917

 

 

 

Anzac hat KIAErwin Mallette SPENCER

Service No:    6114
Rank:             Private
Unit:               6th Battalion, 19th Reinforcement

Born 1887, Mt Duneed
Son of William and Jane Spencer from Connewarre
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a labourer

Erwin enlisted 16/02/1916 at Leongatha as a married man
He embarked for overseas 28/07/1916 from Melbourne on HMAT A32 Themestosles

While in training, as early as May, Erwin had complained of trouble seeing and pain in his right shoulder. The doctor could not find the cause of either because his answers appeared to be inconsistent. He was sent to an eye specialist and a question mark was place on his record that maybe he has a tumour. He was returned to duty with his Major suspicious of Erwin’s motives. Subsequently during the transport to Egypt Erwin died of Meningitis on 17/8/1916 and was buried at sea.

 

 

volunteered badgeRobert Joshua TAIT

Service No:
Rank:             Private
Unit:              S Coy, 5th Battalion, Seymour

Born 1898, Mt Duneed
Son of George and Mary Tait from Barwon Heads
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a farmer

Robert enlisted 22/07/1915 at Geelong as a single man

On enlistment Robert was attached to D Coy, 5th Training Depot Battalion training at Broadmeadows. Later he transferred to S Coy, 5th Battalion at Seymour. Four months after enlistment it was discovered that he had enlisted as a minor (18 years), even though he had permission from his parents to volunteer for active service and the age restriction had been lowered to 18 years during June. He was therefore discharged.

 

 

volunteered badgeJohn Daniel THOMPSON

Service No:    57584
Rank:             Private
Unit:             depot ‘M’ Coy, 2nd Battalion

Born 1888, Lovely Banks, Geelong
Son of Samuel and Mary Thompson from Connewarre
His occupation prior to enlistment was as a farmer

John enlisted 31/10/1916 at Geelong as a single man

On enlistment John was attached to ‘L’ Coy of the 2nd Battalion at the Geelong Camp. Shortly after he was transferred to ‘M’ Coy, 2nd Battalion stationed at Royal Park and given the rank of Private. During December his officer in charge had concerns about his mental health after returning from a brief leave. On examination it was found that John was suffering from delusional insanity and was subsequently discharged as medically unfit on 17 January 1917.

 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s