Author: togethertheyserved

May – Lest We Forget: John Alex MCDONALD

Web Conne-McDonald JA 2145John enlisted on 17 September 1914 a week after his older brother at the beginning of the war. He was attached to the 6th Battalion, 1st Reinforcements and training at Broadmeadows. On 22 December 1914 he embarked from Melbourne aboard HMAT Themistocles. The ship sailed in across the Indian Ocean, bound for Egypt arriving early February.

After intense training the 6th Battalion landed at Gallipoli as part of the 2nd wave on the 25th April 1915. While attempting to hold back the Turks John was reported on 8 May 1915 as being wounded, then reported as wounded and missing. He was pronounced killed in action by a Court of Enquiry held on 24 April 1916. In 1920 his body was found in a Turkish Cemetery at Pine Ridge, exhumed and re-interred in the Lone Pine Cemetery, Gallipoli.

May – Lest We Forget Percy Graham

Courtesy Aunty Grace via Jen Graham

Courtesy Aunty Grace via Jen Graham

Nineteen year old Percy was one of the first from the Shire to enlist after volunteer recruiting began in Australia enlisting on 10 August 2014. He was allocated to the 8th Infantry Battalion embarking from Melbourne on board HMAT Benalla on 19 October 1914. After a brief stop in Albany, Western Australia, the battalion proceeded to Egypt, arriving on 2 December. Percy spent most the entire trip in hospital with piles and later in isolation because of measles. Percy took part in the ANZAC landing on 25 April 1915, as part of the second wave. Ten days after the landing, the 2nd Brigade was transferred from ANZAC to Cape Helles to help in the attack on the village of Krithia. The attack captured little ground but cost the brigade almost a third of its strength. Percy was one of the casualties of this campaign, he was killed in action on 2 May 1915.

Anzac Day

LEST WE FORGET – ANZAC DAY

Today we commemorate the ‘Landing at Gallipoli’ when 24 servicemen from the Surf Coast Shire went ashore at the Gallipoli Peninsula. They fought the soldiers of the Ottoman Army, mainly up on the ridges well beyond the beaches. The first group ashore landed at dawn; they were the so-called ‘covering force’ whose task was to drive the Turkish defenders into the hills. These men were from the other States. The men from the Shire were part of the main force that went ashore later. 

Anzac hat KIA Lest We Forget

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pte. Leslie Charles BAILEY (Torquay Improvement Association) and Pte. William Jacob FULLER (Connewarre) both from the 5th Battalion died at the landing on this day 100 years ago. LEST WE FORGET.
Their bodies were never recovered for burial, or, if recovered were not identifiable. They are commemorated at the Lone Pine Memorial (Panel 24), Gallipoli, Turkey.

Lest We Forget – April

remembrance

 

Private Leslie Charles BAILEY, Apollo Bay was Killed in Action, Gallipoli Pensinsula on 25/04/1915. He is remembered at The Lone Pine Memorial, Gallipoli

Private William Jacob FULLER, Connewarre was Killed in Action, Gallipoli Peninsula, Turkey on 25/04/1915. He is remembered at The Lone Pine Memorial, Gallipoli

 

Private  Alfred Ernest GREEN, Deans Marsh was Killed in Action, France on 11/04/1917. He is remembered at Villers-Bretonneux, Australian National Memorial

Private Charles Leslie Wallace ANDERSON, Ceres was Killed in action, Ballecomt, France on 11/04/1917. He is remembered at Villers-Bretonneux, Australian National Memorial

Private Sydney Gordon CHALLIS, Connewarre was Killed in Action, France on 11/04/1917. He is remembered at Villers-Bretonneux, Australian National Memorial

Private Henry Donald McLEAN, Jan Juc was Killed in Action, France on 18/04/1917. He is remembered at Villers-Bretonneux, Australian National Memorial

 

Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Commonwealth War Graves Commission

 

Trooper George Thomas CLARK, Modewarre was Killed in Action, Gaza, Palestine on 19/04/1917. He is remembered at Jerusalem Memorial, Palestine

 

 

 

 

 

Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Commonwealth War Graves Commission

 

Private Richard Thomas Henry STRIPLING, Freshwater Creek died as a result of illness while a prisoner of war, in Turkey on 30/04/1918. He is remembered at The Basra Memorial, Iraq

 

 

 

Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Commonwealth War Graves Commission

 

Private Noel James BLACK, Wurdale died as a result of disease, in the Langnicourt sector, France on 26/04/1919. He is buried at Grevillers British Cemetery

 

 


 

 

 

On this day….. April 1915

On 4 April 1915, the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) received orders to hold itself in readiness to leave Egypt.  The forces departed Egypt in early April, assembling on the island of Lemnos in Greece, where a small garrison had been established in early March. After arriving on 12 April a number of basic practice landings were undertaken. During the Gallipoli campaign 97 residents left for overseas with 89 of them landing at Gallipoli / Dardanelles, with 21 of these in the initial landings. There were two soldiers killed in action at the initial landing. Overall 26 residents died as a result of the fighting on this peninsula from being a POW (1), killed in action, died of their wounds or died as a result of disease.

Practising for the Landing, Lemnos with 3rd Australian Infantry Brigade.     AWM PS1447

Practising for the Landing, Lemnos with 3rd Australian Infantry Brigade. AWM PS1447

OFF LEMNOS ISLAND, 1915-04-24. COLONEL ROSENTHAL SPEAKING TO 7TH BATTERY, 3 BRIGADE ARTILLERY COLUMN, ABOARD SHIP JUST BEFORE LEAVING LEMNOS ISLAND FOR THE DARDANELLES AND THE GALLIPOLI LANDING. (DONOR: P. SMITH, ESTATE OF R.C.N. SMITH) AWM P00821.004

OFF LEMNOS ISLAND, 1915-04-24. COLONEL ROSENTHAL SPEAKING TO 7TH BATTERY, 3 BRIGADE ARTILLERY COLUMN, ABOARD SHIP JUST BEFORE LEAVING LEMNOS ISLAND FOR THE DARDANELLES AND THE GALLIPOLI LANDING. (DONOR: P. SMITH, ESTATE OF R.C.N. SMITH) AWM P00821.004

Troopships in Mudros Harbour.    AWM H00205

Troopships in Mudros Harbour. AWM H00205

On This Day… March 1915

Once the fighting on the Western Front in France and Flanders settled into siege warfare that defied attempts by both sides to break through, some British politicians became entranced by the idea of attacking Germany ‘by the back door’. Despite pre-war Naval planning that suggested a passage of the Dardanelles Straits was impossible, the lure of an easier route to the defeat of Germany became irresistible. The pro-‘Westerners’ in the high Army command were overruled and eventually acquiesced.

The planning of the Gallipoli operations was makeshift to say the least, but it was based on land operations only being required in support of a naval breakthrough of the Dardanelles Straits.

The naval attempt to bombard the Turkish guns and forts failed, as did a half-hearted attempt to push through the Straits minefields. The Royal Navy now called on the army to capture the guns from the land side, and the door was thus opened to disaster. A Mediterranean Expeditionary Force (MEF) composed of British Empire and French troops was hastily assembled in Egypt. Among the British Empire forces were the men of the AIF (Australian Imperial Force) and the NZEF (New Zealand Expeditionary Force) who had been training in Egypt when the decision to invade Turkey had been taken.

The Naval bombardment of the Straits Forts (9 February – 16 March)
The Naval attempt to force the Straits (18 March)

From <http://www.1914-1918.net/Gallipoli.htm>

On This Day… Jan 1915

January 17, 1915 – The initial Turkish offensive into Russia is thwarted as the Turkish 3rd Army suffers a defeat by the Russian Army of the Caucasus near Kars. The Russians then begin a multi-pronged invasion of the Ottoman Empire from the Caucasus.

January 19, 1915 – Germany begins an aerial bombing campaign against Britain using Zeppelins.

January 31, 1915 – Poison gas is used for the first time in the war as Germans on the Eastern Front attack Russian positions west of Warsaw. Although the Germans fire 18,000 gas shells, they have little effect on the Russians as frigid temperatures prevent the gas from vaporizing.

On this day…..1914

August 4, 1914

Britain declares war on Germany
Australia pledged a force of 20,000 to be placed at Britain’s disposal.

August 10

Volunteer recruiting begins in Australia

August 17 – 26

Within a week of recruitment opening 13 young men with a connection to the Surf Coast signed up for what they believed to be an adventure and service to the country. Aurthur Reginald Taylor (Torquay); William Richard Grant (Deans Marsh); Murray Charles Storrer (Torquay, Anglesea); William McAdam (Modewarre); Albert Edmonds (Bannockburn); Edward Vienet (Ceres); Thomas Doyle (Connewarre); Herbert Marendaz (Mt Duneed); Percy Graham (Connewarre); John Cantwell (Freshwater Creek); Leslie Bailey (Torquay)

August 21

Rupert Vance Moon enlisted in the AIF

September 5

Albert Jacka travelled to Melbourne and enlisted after his initial enlistment papers were lost.

September 11

The Australian Naval and Military Expeditionary Force (ANMEF) seized German New Guinea and nearby German-ruled island territories

October 19

The first soldiers from the Surf Coast embarked from Melbourne aboard –
HMAT A24 Benalla – John Cantwell, Percy Graham, Thomas Doyle, William McAdam, Albert Edmonds, William Grant
HMAT A20 Hororata – Edward Vienet
HMAT A18 Wiltshire – Murray Storrer, Herbert Marendaz

November 1

The First Division of the Australian Imperial Force (AIF) sailed from Albany, Western Australia, for Egypt.

November 9

HMAS Sydney destroys the German raider SMS Emden at the Cocos Islands, Indian Ocean.

November 26

Australian troops in Egypt